Warming makes flowers change dates, or don skates

Blue Fleabane (Erigeron acer) has only moved its flowering date forward around by 3 days in 50 years, and instead the places where it's found in the UK have moved north by around 9 miles. Image credit: Vlad Proklov, used via Flickr Creative Commons licence.

Blue Fleabane (Erigeron acer) has only moved its flowering date forward around by 3 days in 50 years, and instead the places where it’s found in the UK have moved north by around 9 miles. Image credit: Vlad Proklov, used via Flickr Creative Commons licence.

If plants can’t flower earlier to adapt to global warming they’re probably being driven away from where they used to grow, towards cooler places. That’s what new findings on how these responses are linked from Tatsuya Amano at the University of Cambridge and his teammates suggest. “We believe that the link we’ve revealed will help us understand the complex implications of climate change on biodiversity,” Tatsuya told me. “Many studies have relied on models that only consider species’ spatial responses for projecting the impact of climate change on species. We might be able to generate more realistic projections.”

You could think of regular natural events, such as flowering in plants, as being triggered by an alarm clock – another type of dandelion clock, if you like. The study of when those alarms go off is known as phenology. In 2009, Tim Sparks from Coventry University visited Tatsuya, Bill Sutherland and others in Cambridge to give a talk on changes in when these events were happening. He was helped by notes on plant life many people in the UK had jotted down in their spare time, but that data’s inevitable patchiness caused him problems.

Bill and Tatsuya were working on mathematical models that helped fix similar problems in bird count data, and so they offered to help Tim with his work. They were also joined by Richard Smithers, then in charge of the Nature’s Calendar archive run by the UK’s Woodland Trust. He helped them realise the power of this publicly-accessible record of over 250 years’ worth of data on 405 UK species, nearly 400,000 records in all. Using that information, in 2010 the team showed that UK flowers are now blooming earlier in the year than in any 25-year period since 1760.

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