Heavier people mean weightier vehicle emissions

Between 1970 and 2010 the average weight across all overweight and obese American men and women increased approximately 5 kg and 6 kg, respectively, and that has added to the fuel needed to transport them, and greenhouse gas emissions in turn. Image copyright Neil Hester, used unaltered via <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/">Flickr Creative Commons license</a>.

Between 1970 and 2010 the average weight across all overweight and obese American men and women increased approximately 5 kg and 6 kg, respectively, and that has added to the fuel needed to transport them, and greenhouse gas emissions in turn. Image copyright Neil Hester, used unaltered via Flickr Creative Commons license.

In case we needed any reasons other than health to watch our weight, a team at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, has found some. Michelle Tom and her co-workers have looked at how our extra weight adds to the cost and carbon footprint of transport in the US. From 1970 to 2010, the extra fuel needed to carry overweight passengers’ ‘excess weight’ cost $103 billion in total. That in turn created extra greenhouse gas emissions over the 40-year period equivalent to half a billion tonnes of CO2. “Obesity is not just a public health issue, but also has implications for natural resource use and environmental degradation,” Michelle told me.

Weight is important in vehicle fuel use, with developing lighter cars playing a key role in recent efforts to make them more efficient. Working with PhD supervisor Chris Hendrickson, Michelle is studying the strain our heavier societies put on our resources, and therefore tackled the fuel burden from extra weight. “There have been headlines about the health issues associated with people being overweight and obese, but there has been very little analysis of what this means in terms of things like fuel use and calorie intake,” Chris noted.

Michelle pulled together data for personal vehicles, public transport and aircraft, including how many there are, how full they are, and how much fuel they’ve used. And thanks to efforts made to lighten vehicles, she also had access to good information on how weight affects fuel consumption. She could bring this together with records of the US population, how many of them drive, and how much they exceed the highest ‘normal’ body mass index. Combining all this with data on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions and fuel costs meant Michelle could calculate how heavy the impact of heavier people has been. Read the rest of this entry »

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Dump fossil fuels for the health of our hearts

Air quality in London on April 3, 2014 fell to a level where it became hard to see normally-visible skyscrapers. Conditions hit a 9/10 risk ranking  thanks to a combination of pollution and dust blown in from the Sahara desert. Tackling such pollution could immediately improve people's health, stresses New York University's George Thurston. Image copyright David Holt, used via Flickr Creative Commons license.

Air quality in London on April 3, 2014 fell to a level where it became hard to see normally-visible skyscrapers. Conditions hit a 9/10 risk ranking thanks to a combination of pollution and dust blown in from the Sahara desert. Tackling such pollution could immediately improve people’s health, stresses New York University’s George Thurston. Image copyright David Holt, used via Flickr Creative Commons license.

Sometimes when I blow my nose and – inevitably – look into my handkerchief, I see that my snot is black. It doesn’t happen when I’m at home, in the small English city of Exeter, only when I’m in London. It’s a clear sign of the extra pollution I’m inhaling when I’m in the capital – one backed up by data published last week by Public Health England. Its striking report says that in 2010 73 deaths per thousand in the London borough of Waltham Forest, where my girlfriend’s sister lives, could be put down to grimy air. For Exeter, the figure was just 42 per 1000. Across the whole of England, pollution killed 25,002 people in 2010, or 56 of every 1000 deaths nationwide.

But wherever you live, air pollution will become even more important as the climate changes, while fighting this scourge could also help the world bring global warming under control. “There’s more than enough rationale for controlling emissions based on the health effects and the benefits that we get as a society from getting off of fossil fuels,” New York University’s George Thurston told me. “Those are the benefits that are going to accrue to the people who do the clean-up – locally and immediately, not fifty years from now.”

Public Health England is trying to draw attention to ‘particulate matter’, or dust, less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter, too small to see with our naked eye. You won’t find this ‘PM2.5’ pollution listed as people’s cause of death – it’s likely to be down as a heart attack or lung cancer. George has run huge studies in the US to help work out exactly how much such dust worsens people’s health. One study for the American Cancer Society followed 1.2 million men and women originally enrolled in 1982. Another, started in 1995, tracked over 500,000 US retirees over the following decade. And he was also a part of a worldwide project that last year showed ‘global particulate matter pollution is a major avoidable risk to the health of humankind’. Read the rest of this entry »